Proposition 63: Background checks to be issued for ammunition purchases

Californian’s will be able to vote this upcoming state ballot on Prop. 63 which would require citizens to get a background check in order to purchase ammunition if it passes. (Flickr/Andrew. Used with a CC BY 2.0 license.)

Californian’s will be able to vote this upcoming state ballot on Prop. 63 which would require citizens to get a background check in order to purchase ammunition if it passes.
(Flickr/Andrew. Used with a CC BY 2.0 license.)

California citizens will be able to vote on Proposition 63 this upcoming state ballot on Nov. 8 amongst 16 other propositions. For those unfamiliar with this proposition, it’s focused on requiring background checks for ammunition purchases for firearms.

Although this year alone, U.S. citizens may have their attention highly directed on this presidential election, that doesn’t discredit Californians from amassing a monumental accomplishment in registering for the state ballot. 

There are now more registered voters in California than the population of 46 states, which continues to surge, state election officials say. 45.2 percent of the CA voters are democratic while 26.2 percent are republican. The rest have no party preference or are categorized as other.

In an updated archive on gun violence 43,677 total number of incidents in the country are related firearms.

Recently, in California, two police officers were killed in Palm Springs by a man who was wearing soft border armor and possessed a high number of capacity magazines, that led to his arrest. Incidents as such, are why lawmakers have put forth the proposition, which would require for background checks before ammunition purchases as well as the ban of large capacity magazines.

To put in perspective, if Prop. 63 were to pass, individuals that fit under certain three different categories such as:
1. Those convicted of felonies and misdemeanors.
2. Those found by a court to be a danger to themselves or others due to mental illness.
3. Those with a restraining order against them.

Those candidates would therefore not be allowed to have firearms.

In addition to the above, the CA law would also monitor the types of firearms that could be bought, which would require a waiting period before those seeking the purchase of a gun.

Californians would also have to obtain a four-year permit that they too would pay for in order to buy ammunition.

Supporters of the proposition known as Safety for All led by Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom of CA, voice that through this law, lives will be saved, as preventing criminals that are domestic abusers or are mentally ill will diminish gun violence.

However, on the flip side, the opposition led by The Coalition for Civil Liberties, feel that it will cause for an unnecessary hinder on law-abiding citizens and the process they may be in for without stopping violent criminals from accessing firearms.

Already $4,709,796.24 has been raised in support for Prop. 63, while $653,826.41 has been raised in opposition.
For the ballot measure to be put forward 365,880 Californian citizens would need to sign, costing $2,228,384.05 alone just for this proposition.

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