Volunteers maintain environmental studies garden

“I’m here because I drive past the gardens and horticulture section all the time, and I was curious as to who maintained it and what it looks like.” Said Lina fasheh, 19, criminology. (Shirley Smith)

Shirley Smith

Extra credit-seeking Saddleback College students volunteered at the California native plant garden behind the TAS building on March 13.

The garden is not funded nor maintained by the college. Rather, students constructed it in 1990 by donated materials and supplies.

Since then, volunteer students have maintained the garden with its approximate one hundred native plants including: California lilac, coffee berry and live oaks. These are planted in groupings to designate the six different California ecosystems and are marked with large markers, made and donated by the art department.

John Richards, lab technician and assistant professor in environmental studies, leads volunteers about 15 times a year to whatever chores need to be done. He imparts knowledge about the plants along the way. 

Controlling the wheelbarrow, Lina Fasheh, 19, criminology said, “I’m here, because I drive past the gardens and horticulture section all the time, and I was curious as to who maintained it and what it looks like.”

“We are going to do some work in preparing the surface so we don’t have any weed growth in the summer,” Richards said.

“It’s a good intro to hands on application to the classes I’m taking,” Lauren McIntyre, 23, environmental studies said, scooping mulch into the wheelbarrow. 

According to Richards, the number of students varies from 2 to 52. Many students are looking to boost their grades.

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