KSBR Radio takes on a new world of broadcasting

Cathy Lee Taylor

Rapid technological advances have caused a convergence in media that is shaping a new form of journalism, revolutionizing how we connect with consumers of information whether via TV, radio, or print communication.

KSBR, and its recording studios like this one, is located in the Student Services building. (Cathy Lee Taylor)

KSBR, and its recording studios like this one, is located in the Student Services building. (Cathy Lee Taylor)

Radio used to be free. But if you want the sexy features of listening to music or news wherever you want, whenever you want, and from the exact location that you want, you may be shelling out a little cash to do so.

Consumers seem to love the convenience of getting their information from old-fashioned newspapers, magazines, and books, as well as on their iPad, desktop or laptop computer, radio, and television. There is no denying the digital age has left us with unlimited opportunities.

Exciting, right? Yes and no …

Terry Wedel sits in the control room of the Saddleback's award-winning radio station, KSBR.

Terry Wedel sits in the control room of the Saddleback’s award-winning radio station, KSBR.

Operations Director at KSBR and OC Rock Radio Terry Wedel has seen a multitude of changes at Saddleback in his long tenure.

“Our station must learn how to maintain relevancy with this younger generation,” Wedel said. “As a teacher, I need our students to come up with creative ways to do just that.

Wedel said music consumers today have many more choices and can get their music online through websites and apps such as YouTube or Spotify.

“They don’t have to be in front of a radio to listen,” he said. “It’s a whole new world out there.”

Today, a journalist must meet the requirements of multimedia. In other words, they need to know as much about search engine optimization as they do about AP Style. As a result, journalists entering the workforce today are well advised to create their own brand including a website that portrays their best work.

A Tall Order

Listen to Dawn Kamber at 7 p.m. Monday evenings on KSBR 88.5. (Cathy Lee Taylor)

Listen to Dawn Kamber at 7 p.m. Monday evenings on KSBR 88.5. (Cathy Lee Taylor)

Today’s journalist need a multitude of skills including being able to find and write the news, shoot video, and take photos, record audio, podcast, edit and so much more.

“People who have a working knowledge of all forms of multimedia will have the journalism jobs of the future,” Wedel said. “Most importantly, a journalist needs to be a good storyteller. He or she must recognize a good story and be able to relate it back to their audience in both an entertaining and informative manner.”

The journalism department at Saddleback College is growing to meet these new multimedia requirements. By the end of this school year, plans are to locate the KSBR radio station across from the Lariat newspaper lab in the LRC building so the two departments can work more closely together. Discussions have already begun as to how each department can help the other.

“Amara Aguilar, the upcoming chair for the journalism department, and I have been traveling around to other colleges to see how they are dealing with all of the new forms of media,” Wedel said. “We have some great ideas of how to bring our students into this new future and give them the kind of knowledge they will to need to get the best journalism jobs. It really is an exciting time for journalists.”

For more ways to listen to KSBR and OC Rock, go to http://www.ksbr.org/webcast.html

To review programming scheduling to go to http://www.ksbr.org/programs.html

For local news and public affairs, tune into KSBR and Dawn Kamber at 7 p.m. on Monday evenings. On September 3, Dawn will be speaking about the “Electronic Overload in Children.” Go to www.KSBR.org for more scheduling information.

Listen to KSBR at 88.5 FM and OC Rock radio online at OCRockRadio.com

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