Your future through a lens

karlysaks

Karly Sacks stands proud of the showcase she put together for her senior project.

Prospective CTVR (cinema/TV/radio) students attended a film showcase at Saddleback College last Friday evening, organized by Cal State Fullerton student Karly Sacks in collaboration with Saddleback instructors Mark Kruhmin and Charlie Meyers, in Business and General Studies Room 254,

“You know, it’s funny cause she came to me and I thought, I’ve done enough of these. I don’t need anymore,” Media Production Specialist Mark Kruhmin said. “But then she told me it was for her senior project, so I said ‘hey why not.’”

After obtaining her bachelor’s degree in Tele-dramatic Arts and Technology, a fancy name for film production, Sacks returned to Cal State Fullerton where she is pursuing a master’s degree in professional communications. A personal proposal was assigned as a senior project where she was required to prepare and execute a professional project. To get the word out, she traveled to 20 schools where she handed out fliers for the event “all the way from Tustin, down to San Juan and everywhere in between,” Sacks said.

Sacks wanted to bring awareness of Saddleback’s Cinema/T.V./Radio program to as many high school and middle school students as possible and thought a showcase of past students’ work would be a great opportunity.

While studying at CSUF, she experienced a variety of classes from broadcast to event planning, where she helped plan the Newport Film Festival. Being unsure of what she wanted to do helped develop her project.

“Ultimately I would like a lot more students to enroll in the program,” Sacks said. “For people who aren’t sure what they want to do, it’s a great way to learn something.”

Media Production Specialist Mark Kruhmin was supportive of CSUF graduate student Karly Sack's project to showcase student films to increase awareness of the program. (Lindsey Goetsch)

Media Production Specialist Mark Kruhmin was supportive of CSUF graduate student Karly Sack’s project to showcase student films to increase awareness of the program. (Lindsey Goetsch)

Kruhmin and Meyers assisted Sacks with the showcase by going through student films that were made 10 years ago. “30 Seconds”, “Broken Border”, “Hit the Lights” and “Finding Chance” were created with little or no equipment.

Meyers said it was an interesting progression to see what students were doing with a broom stick with a hand-held microphone attached to it and loves watching the films today. The advancement in technology and upgraded equipment has made a big difference in the quality of the student’s work and the program itself.

“The most fun thing watching them is thinking about the hell they went through to get these pictures made.” Meyers said.

meyer

CTVR Professor Charlie Meyers finds a comfy spot before the film showcase.

Before Kruhmin turned on the first movie, he sarcastically warned the audience that the content might be slightly more than PG.

“I actually kind of find this ironic that our department is always taking grief because of our student films, and tonight at the McKinney theatre they’re opening the “Best Little Whorehouse in Texas” and no one says a word.” Kruhmin said.

Being a part of the CTVR program includes state of the art equipment, professional instructors and hands-on experience, and career opportunities, such as screenwriter, radio personality, videographer and production manager.

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