World-renowned pianist Eduardo Delgado receives a standing ovation

Pianist Eduardo Delgado, a professor at the School of Music at Cal State Fullerton and recipient of the Vladimir Horowitz Award, performed at the McKinney Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Nina Welsh)

Pianist Eduardo Delgado, a professor at the School of Music at Cal State Fullerton and recipient of the Vladimir Horowitz Award, performed at the McKinney Theatre. (Photo courtesy of Nina Welsh)

Although the doors to Saddleback College’s McKinney Theatre remained closed, the audience members patiently waited outside on a nearby patio, awaiting the performance of pianist Eduardo Delgado.  The cool breeze brought some relief to the warm temperatures and musical notes could be heard as the musician warmed up in a nearby room.

When the doors opened and the audience took their seats,  several expressed their excitement of seeing the master play.

Delgado gracefully entered, and moved towards center stage, where he quietly stood dressed in head-to-toe black at the grand piano. Quickly he smiled at the audience and reviewed the program of what he would be performing.

He is currently a professor of piano in the School of Music at California State University, Fullerton.

“Every note must come alive,” Delgado said. “I tell that to all of my students, and how important it is to learn about the composer and what they were going through during that time.”

Delgado passionately stretched the importance of projecting the emotions of the composer into the piece so that it becomes lyrical and to avoid being “mechanical.”

After speaking, Delgado took his seat and lightly placed his hands on the piano. A moment of quiet was vital for him. He was about to endeavor on the composure of Franz Joseph Haydn’s “Variations in F minor, Hob. XVII:6.”

He began playing with a royal eloquence, lightly peddling with his feet and touching the keys, beginning with a melancholic tone and climaxing to something angelic. The man displayed passion, invigorating even the passerby to stop and listen.

He continued into Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Sonata No. 32 op. 111 in C Minor,” which escalated the goosebump-worthy performance to supreme heights.

Following a brief intermission, Delgado began his grand finale of Robert Schumann’s “Symphonic Etudes Op. 13 and Op. posthumous,” pausing briefly to wipe the sweat from his brow.

Even with his eyes closed and knowing where each key was, this Argentinian pianist proved himself yet again to be the proud recipient of the Vladimir Horowitz Award.

He finished and then came a standing ovation from the audience.

A reviewer from the New York Times wrote, “Eduardo Delgado, the Argentinian pianist, is an impressive artist! He is a talent to reckon with,” according to the pianist’s website.

 

 

 

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